Tag Archives: Red Admiral

View of reddish orange and black butterfly with white markings on the wings resting on a silver leafed Artemisia plant.

Red Admiral. Photo: John East

We were sitting in the dining room today, 10/11/2019, when my wife noticed a butterfly flying in the back garden which then settled on an Artemisia plant – we both said it must be a Red Admiral which proved to be the case and it stayed on the plant just long enough for me to get this photo.  Shortly before we saw this butterfly we had both remarked that we didn’t think we would see any more butterflies in the garden this year and then this one appeared just to show how wrong we were.

View of reddish orange and black butterfly with some white wing markings nectaring on an Ivy flower.

Red Admiral. Photo: George McCabe

View of orange and black butterflies nectaring on an Ivy plant.

Comma and Red Admirals. Photo: George McCabe

George tells us that he ventured out yesterday afternoon 03/11/2019 on a beautiful, warm, sunny day after a very stormy night. He went up the Old Coach Road at Upwey, Weymouth where he spotted four Red Admirals and one Comma on 2 Ivy bushes. The first picture shows the Red Admiral still looking great after all the stormy weather and the second photo shows a Comma in the foreground and Red Admirals near the top of the Ivy plant set against a clear blue sky.

View of black and reddish butterfly with white wing markings nectaring on Ivy flower.

Red Admiral. Photo: Shona Refoy

View of black and reddish butterfly with white wing markings resting on the photographers blue trousers.

Red Admiral. Photo: Shona Refoy

Shona sent us these photos of a Red Admiral which she took at Ulwell yesterday, 22/10/2019.  The first photo shows it nectaring on Ivy and looking rather lovely against the blue sky.  When it had finished Shona told us it flew away a short distance, then flew straight back towards her and sat on her leg for a little while. She added that It’s not the first time that a Red Admiral has sat on her but it is the first time she has managed to get a photo!

View of 3 black, reddish orange butterflies with some white markings all resting on the green flowers of an Ivy plant.

Red Admirals. Photo: Shona Refoy

View of black and reddish orange butterfly with some white wings markings whilst resting on greyish white Old Man's Beard plant.

Red Admiral. Photo: Shona Refoy

 

Shona has sent us these two photos she took on 19/10/2019 of some of the Red Admirals she saw as she walked up the path to Badbury Rings. She tells us that she saw a total of 31 Red Admirals, mostly nectaring on Ivy but when it clouded over most of them disappeared. The first photo shows three of them nectaring on Ivy when the sun had just gone in and the second photo shows one sitting on an Old Man’s Beard plant – looks very Autumnal.

Almost all of the recent photos of Red Admirals sent in recently show them nectaring on Ivy reinforcing the importance of the plant for butterflies.

View of black and reddish butterfly with some white wing markings

Red Admiral. Photo: Paul Godier

View of black and reddish butterfly with some white wing markings nectaring on Ivy plant flowers.

Red Admiral. Photo: Paul Godier

Despite the recent very changeable weather, Red Admirals have been seen in many parts of Dorset and Paul found this to be the case on Boscombe cliff on 20/10/2019 where he saw eight of them enjoying the late burst of nectar available from Ivy flowers.  He sent us photos of two of them and also mentioned that whilst there he saw a Hummingbird hawk-moth flitting on Plumbago.

Red Admirals are usually most abundant in September but in mild, sunny Autumns it is not unusual to see them on the wing well into November with many migrating back towards the continent at this time.

View of 3 different species of orange and black butterflies on green Ivy plant

Red Admiral, Comma and Painted Lady. Photo: George McCabe

George sent us this photo he took on 06/10/2019 when he was walking on the Old Coach Road from Upwey to the Ridgeway. He added that there were plenty of Red Admirals about together with Painted Ladies and Commas and also a Peacock which he tried hard to get into the photo as well.  The butterflies were all brought out by the warm, sunny day and like so many found the Ivy a great source of nectar.

View of two butterflies on a pink flower - one orange and black and the other red with white and black eye spot markings.

Peacock and Red Admiral. Photo: Shona Refoy

View of two butterflies on pink flowers - both orange and black but one also with white wing markings.

Painted Lady and Comma. Photo: Shona Refoy

Following a recent very productive butterfly visit to Kingston Lacy Kitchen Garden,  Shona wrote in to tell us that she went back there again on 02/10/2019 and on a Eupatorium in the corner found the favourite nectar source where she saw 1 Red Admiral, 1 Painted Lady, 1 Large White, and at least 2 Peacocks and Commas just on this one plant. Shona has sent in these photos of some of them to share with us adding that she loves photos of non-matching pairs of butterflies – with results like these we can understand why.

View of red and black butterfly with some white markings

Red Admiral. Photo: John East

John sent in this photo of a Red Admiral and told us that on a very wet and windy afternoon, 27/09/2019, he was looking out over his garden wondering when the torrential rain would stop.  Suddenly it did and 3 minutes later he noticed a flash of red out of the corner of his eye. Looking through the window more closely he then saw this Red Admiral which had settled on some gravel.  It was In very good condition particularly bearing in mind the hostile weather for butterflies and must have found a very good place to shelter in out of the rain.

View of orange and black butterfly with white markings on wing tips on a Hebe plant

Red Admiral. Photo: Mike Fairbairn

Mike was prompted by Nigel to send this photo in for the gallery.  It shows a Red Admiral on a Hebe bush in his Dorchester garden on the evening of Sunday, 15/09/2019.  What he liked about this image and is particularly significant is the way one wing is back lit by the rays of the setting sun making it appear yellow not orange.  Without Mike’s explanation this could mistakenly be thought to be an aberration. A very interesting and super photo and very glad he did as Nigel suggested.