Tag Archives: Duke of Burgundy

Duke of Burgundy and Marsh Fritillary Cerne

Fresh-looking Marsh Fritillary with open wings

Marsh Fritillary. Photo: Brian Arnold.

An unusually light Duke of Burgundy butterfly

Duke of Burgundy. Photo: Brian Arnold

The second photo above might be the same butterfly as the one taken by Mark Pike a little further down this page, but we thought it worth showing it to agree with Brian’s point that it could be confused with the Marsh Fritillary at a glance. Both photos taken at Cerne Giant Hill on 30 May.

Duke of Burgundy Cerne

Pair of butterflies, side view, clinging to a seed head on a stalk

Duke of Burgundy mating pair. Photo: James Gould

I went on the Dorset butterfly walk this Sunday 15th May at Giant Hill, Cerne Abbas and these photos were two of the highlights. A mating pair of Duke of Burgundy and a Grizzled and Dingy Skipper posing together.

Two small brown butterflies in among grass

Grizzled (on left) and Dingy Skippers. Photo James Gould

Cerne Giant Hill walkabout enjoyed by over 40 visitors

Two Duke of Burgundy butterflies, back to back in mating position
Duke of Burgundy, mating. Photo: Mark Pike

On 17 May butterfly enthusiasts travelled from across Dorset as well as from Devon and London to join a guided walk over the ancient chalk downland above Cerne Abbas. They were rewarded with the sighting of eighteen species, one of the most significant of which was the Duke of Burgundy Continue reading

Cerne Downs Walk

This event took place on Sunday 26 May and was attended by twenty-five people keen to see the chalk downland species of late spring. The first really warm weather of the butterfly season meant they were suitably rewarded during a three hour trek along the hills to the north of Cerne Abbas. Dingy Skippers and Small Heaths were there in good numbers plus an occasional Grizzled Skipper. Photographers in the party had the benefit of a fresh Green Hairstreak settling on the turf for a period of time (see picture), which was a new species for some walkers. Another welcome species appearing just once was the Small Copper. Progress along the eastern slopes produced a number of Marsh Fritillaries, indicating a widespread increase in their caterpillar foodplant: devil’s-bit scabious, in that area.

Green Hairstreak

Green Hairstreak. Photo: Colin Burningham.

Once the lowest northwest slopes were reached, the appearance of the regular colony of Duke of Burgundies on the wing was a highlight of the day (see photo). As with last year, this rare and endangered butterfly flew in records numbers, on this occasion about fifteen in total. A return to the starting point found more Marsh Fritillaries to enjoy along the sunny western slopes

Duke of Burgundy butterfly

Duke of Burgundy. Photo: Colin Varndell

Once the lowest northwest slopes were reached, the appearance of the regular colony of Duke of Burgundies on the wing was a highlight of the day (see photo). As with last year, this rare and endangered butterfly flew in records numbers, on this occasion about fifteen in total. A return to the starting point found more Marsh Fritillaries to enjoy along the sunny western slopes.