Tag Archives: dark green fritillary

View of a resting brown butterfly with some black and lighter coloured markings

Dark Green Fritillary. Photo: Rob Morrison

Fontmell Down seems to have been the place to be yesterday, 03/08/2020 and Rob has sent us this photo with his comments about his visit:

I had the pleasure to socially distance meet Shona Refoy and Mark Pike at Fontmell Down today.   It was good to talk butterflies. Shona very kindly shared her first found Silver-spotted Skipper and I was finally later able to find another.  Incidentally, both males.  I attach a photo of a Dark Green Fritillary I also saw which despite the ragged appearance was still able to fly fast and strong.  

Orange butterfly with black markings resting on green grass

Dark Green Fritillary. Photo: Paul Freedman

Paul has sent us this photo with the following comments:

Was out this morning, 07/06/2020 at Target Bottom (an area at the eastern foot of Godlingston Hill that has been used as a rifle range and clay pigeon shooting area for many years) hoping to see an early Gatekeeper or two. No luck with that but was rewarded with this beautiful male Dark Green Fritillary. This is an uncommon butterfly at this site and appeared to be the only one.

A pale orange and greenish brown butterfly with white markings on a green plant stem

Dark Green Fritillary. Photo: Mike Kirby

Mike and his partner Sarah were very excited to find this very fresh newly emerged Dark Green Fritillary at Badbury Rings on 02/06/2020, posing nicely for a photo and they commented that they could even see its crumpled wings.

Orange butterfly with black and white markings nesctaring on a yellow flower

Dark Green Fritillary. Photo: Colin Elkins

Colin has sent us this photo with the following comments:

Took this photo of a Dark Green Fritillary at Badbury Rings today, 01/06/2020.  My wife and I saw a few flying around but they are so quick! Eventually one stopped for a few seconds for me to capture this shot.

The Field Guide books describe this as a fast flying butterfly which as Colin found out today is very apt.

 

View of an orange, green and brown butterfly with some white markings resting on a green leaf

Dark Green Fritillary. Photo: Mel Bray

View of an orange butterfly with black markings resting on a green leaf

Dark Green Fritillary. Photo: Mel Bray

This elegant, fast flying and most common of all the fritillaries in Britain has only recently been sighted in Dorset this year – Mel managed to capture one in these photos taken on 26/05/2020 and has sent them to us with the following comment:

Saw three very fresh looking Dark Green Fritillaries at Badbury Rings this afternoon. Here are a couple of shots of the one that paused long enough for me to take pics

Orange and Brown butterfly with open wings

Dark Green Fritillary. Photo: Brian Arnold

 

underside of a butterfly showing white pearls on a green and light orange base

Dark Green Fritillary Photo: Brian Arnold

Brian was at Godlingston Heath on 24/06/19 and found this lovely Dark Green Fritillary and tells us:

There was a very strong wind and the butterfly was trying to hide down in the grass. It refused to move or fly despite me moving bits of grass out of the way to get his photo.

Nothing would tempt him to open his wings, except letting it climb onto my finger, and when I put it back onto the grass he immediately shut his wings again. 

A lovely fresh specimen and good to be able to see the underside so clearly.

a bright orange butterfly with dark markings resting with open wings on leaves

Dark Green Fritillary. Photo: Shona Refoy

Visiting Badbury Rings on 14/06/19 Shona found her first Dark Green Fritillary of the year. This one is a male, showing the distinct bright orange background with dark markings, whereas the females are much paler with light coloured lower wing markings.

View of a Dark Green Fritillary showing the under hindwing markings

Dark Green Fritillary. Photo: Paul Swann

Paul sent us this photo of a Dark Green Fritillary which he saw at Badbury Rings in late June 2018.

The Dark Green Fritillary is the most widespread fritillary found in the British Isles and is a pleasure to see as it flies powerfully over its grassland habitats, frequently stopping to nectar on Thistles and Knapweed. It gets its name from the green hue found on the underside of the hindwings, which are peppered with large silver spots.

view of a Dark Green Fritillary nectaribng on a thistle showing uppersides of fore and -hind-wings

Dark Green Fritillary. Photo: Alison Copland

This Dark Green Fritillary was photographed at Ballard Down by Alison on 21/06/18.

The Dark Green Fritillary is the most widespread fritillary found in the British Isles and is a pleasure to see as it flies powerfully over its grassland habitats, frequently stopping to nectar on Thistles and Knapweed. It gets its name from the green hue found on the underside of the hindwings, which are peppered with large silver spots.

 

view of the upper fore and hind-wings of a Dark Green Fritillary

Dark Green Fritillary. Photo: Mark Pike

Mark spotted this Dark Green Fritillary at Badbury Rings on 6/06/18 .They only emerged a week or so ago in the UK and when the sun shines there should be good numbers to be found.

 

It favours open grassy flowery slopes, clearings in light woodland, and damp meadows, heaths and moors.

The caterpillar foodplants are Common Dog, Hairy and Marsh Violets and wild pansies.The caterpillar eats the eggshell on hatching and immediately enters hibernation in a curled up leaf or other piece of debris. The larva emerges in the spring and starts to feed on the tenderest new growth of the foodplant, either eating large chunks out of the leaf lobes, or eating the leaf entirely with the stem left standing. It is most active during sunny periods and can often be seen wandering across bare ground or short turf in search of the foodplant. The mature larva has a distinct colouring, being mostly black with a feint yellow band running down its back and a series of red spots running down each side. There are 5 moults in total.