Tag Archives: Comma

View of reddish orange and black butterfly with some white wing markings nectaring on an Ivy flower.

Red Admiral. Photo: George McCabe

View of orange and black butterflies nectaring on an Ivy plant.

Comma and Red Admirals. Photo: George McCabe

George tells us that he ventured out yesterday afternoon 03/11/2019 on a beautiful, warm, sunny day after a very stormy night. He went up the Old Coach Road at Upwey, Weymouth where he spotted four Red Admirals and one Comma on 2 Ivy bushes. The first picture shows the Red Admiral still looking great after all the stormy weather and the second photo shows a Comma in the foreground and Red Admirals near the top of the Ivy plant set against a clear blue sky.

View of orange and brown butterfly with brown/black spots resting on green Ivy.

Comma. Photo: Brian Arnold

A photo to brighten up a wet and grey October day. Brian sent us this photo taken on 22/10/2019 in his Harman’s Cross garden in sunshine which had brought out several butterflies including this quite fresh looking Comma.  Brian commented that despite looking so fresh it seems to have part of it’s left rear wing missing. However, bearing in mind the recent weather conditions it would have experienced it’s not too surprising that it may be a bit weather-beaten.

View of an orange butterfly with black spots on a green leaf

Comma. Photo: Edmund Mackrill.

During the past few weeks of very changeable weather, our butterflies have shown how quickly they can react to the conditions and this photo of a Comma sent to us by Edmund Mackrill illustrates this perfectly. Edmund told us that when he was at RSPB Radipole on 15/10/2019 the sun brought out a number of butterflies but for him this lovely Comma was the highlight.

View of 3 different species of orange and black butterflies on green Ivy plant

Red Admiral, Comma and Painted Lady. Photo: George McCabe

George sent us this photo he took on 06/10/2019 when he was walking on the Old Coach Road from Upwey to the Ridgeway. He added that there were plenty of Red Admirals about together with Painted Ladies and Commas and also a Peacock which he tried hard to get into the photo as well.  The butterflies were all brought out by the warm, sunny day and like so many found the Ivy a great source of nectar.

View of two butterflies on a pink flower - one orange and black and the other red with white and black eye spot markings.

Peacock and Red Admiral. Photo: Shona Refoy

View of two butterflies on pink flowers - both orange and black but one also with white wing markings.

Painted Lady and Comma. Photo: Shona Refoy

Following a recent very productive butterfly visit to Kingston Lacy Kitchen Garden,  Shona wrote in to tell us that she went back there again on 02/10/2019 and on a Eupatorium in the corner found the favourite nectar source where she saw 1 Red Admiral, 1 Painted Lady, 1 Large White, and at least 2 Peacocks and Commas just on this one plant. Shona has sent in these photos of some of them to share with us adding that she loves photos of non-matching pairs of butterflies – with results like these we can understand why.

View of orange butterfly on yellow flower

Comma. Photo: Dave Law

View of red,black and white butterfly on blue flower

Red Admiral. Photo: Dave Law

Dave visited Alners Gorse on 05/09/2019 and sent in these lovely photos taken on his visit there.  He commented that although the season may be winding down Alners Gorse is still a fantastic place to go for a good variety of butterflies and whilst there he saw immaculate Commas, Green-veined Whites in good numbers as well as Red Admirals, Common Blues , Painted Ladies and Small Tortoiseshells.

Orange and Brown butterfly with wings like pieces of a jigsaw

Comma. Photo: Brian Arnold

Orange and brown butterfly sunning itself on an orange daylily

Comma. Photo: Brian Arnold

Brian’s garden at Harman’s Cross is always full of surprises and this one is amusing as he tells us on 25/07/19:

Nectar plants are obviously a waste of time! All you need is a yellow hose.This Comma has been posing on our hose every afternoon this week in our garden. It must either like the colour or perhaps it thinks it cannot be seen against the yellow background. It also seems to like our Day lilies – it was hopping between a “Pose on the Hose”, and “Displaying on a Day Lily” today.

Light brown underside of a Comma, hutchinsoni, nectaring on Buddleia

Comma, hutchinsoni, Photo: Dave Law

Dave sent us this photo on 25/07/19 and says:

This female comma is the golden form hutchinsoni . It was swapping between feeding on buddleia and egg laying on elm and nettles in the hedgerow at Duncliffe Wood

This form is found throughout its range and represents individuals that go on to produce a second brood, which differ from those individuals that overwinter as follows:

  1. Overall appearance much paler.
  2. The underside is especially paler, being yellow-brown with darker markings nearer the body, and with a few green spots and other marks at the wing margins.
Oragne and brown heavily patterned butterfly resting on a leaf

Comma. Photo: Paul Godier

This lovely fresh Comma was spotted by Paul at Boscombe Chine Gardens on 21/07/19.

The first Comma reported this year was in Feb, and the only other species reported earlier that month was a Brimstone,beating the Comma sighting by just one day. Interesting information like this and more can be found at www.dorsetbutterflies.com/sightings

tiny white egg od a Comma Butterfly laid on a neetle

Comma Egg. Photo: Dave Law

Dave saw a light golden Comma, known as hutchinsoni form laying an egg on nettles at the side of his pond near Shaftesbury on  14/07/19.

The photo is purposely left uncropped to show the size of the egg in relation to just a part of the nettle leaf.

This form is found throughout its range and represents individuals that go on to produce a second brood, which differ from those individuals that overwinter as follows:

  • 1. Overall appearance much paler.
  • 2. The underside is especially paler, being yellow-brown with darker markings nearer the body, and with a few green spots and other marks at the wing margins.