News

Could you fill a White Hole?

Map of Dorset showing how many species have been recorded in each kilometer square

‘White Holes’ is a Dorset term for kilometer squares where no butterfly has been reported in the current five-year cycle of recording. We are now in year three of the 2015-19 cycle, so we are starting to get a feel for where more recording effort is needed. Continue reading

How are Dorset’s butterflies doing?

Distribution map: Small Copper
Distribution map: Small Copper

In order to help butterflies, we need to know about them first. If you haven’t spotted our Distribution Atlas pages yet, do go and have a look at them; they can be accessed via our ‘Recording‘ page.

Our Records Officer, Bill Shreeves, has done a magnificent job taking both a long-term and short-term view of our records from 1970 to 2014, showing how the various species have fared in Dorset. Each species has a distribution map of sightings between 2010 and 2014, followed by information showing population trends.

This is still a work in progress. We will be adding Dorset flight-time charts soon, and Bill is working on further ways of illustrating trends, and hopefully we may be able to crunch the numbers to achieve some abundance data, too.

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Help needed at Lankham on 15 Feb

Lots of small black furry caterpillars among dry grass
Marsh Fritillary caterpillars at Lankham on 7 February 2017. Photo: Nigel Spring.

Tuesday February 7th, Lankham Bottom Butterfly Reserve:  a beautiful almost spring-like day and possibly the earliest recorded date for Marsh Fritillary larvae on this site sunning themselves in a cluster on the southwest facing slopes of the reserve. Continue reading